10 Timeshare Sales Tactics to Watch Out For


Here is a list of ten tactics you should be aware of before agreeing to or attending any timeshare presentation:

  1. Holding contests (I know you all have seen the boxes at the grocery stores and restaurants asking you to fill out a short form for a chance to WIN BIG!) without informing consumers that they must listen to a lengthy (and well-orchestrated) sales pitch before claiming their prizes.Misrepresentation of a resort’s physical condition, market value, and resale potential. Timeshare salespeople will commonly mislead you into believing that timeshares represent an investment and/or a way to make additional income.
  2. Beware of oral promises omitted from the written contract – this includes fees and obligations.
  3. All timeshare salespeople will make you feel as though tomorrow does not exist and pressure you into closing the deal that day.
  4. The presentations are full of misdirection and distractions. For example, music is often played loudly to conceal conversations at neighboring tables and to draw attention to new owners (possibly fake new owners) when the music is turned down and their names are announced.
  5. The salespeople can and will write upside down and read upside down, this is guaranteed to throw you off at first.
  6. Most will use a yellow legal pad and felt-tipped pens, this is probably because of the loudness of the color yellow and boldness of the felt tip – it gives the feeling of a deal.
  7. They will have favorite pages marked in the book and based on the initial questionnaire you fill out, the timeshare salesperson will be able to rapidly find these places of interest and refer back to them repeatedly.
  8. Timeshare sales contracts (commonly referred to as ‘legal jargon’ by salespeople) usually contain clauses that disclaim any promises made during the sales pitch – if the salesperson will not put it in writing, do not go through with the sale.
  9. The salespeople will use high pressure tactics and are very persistent, they will stretch the truth, use half-truths and omit just as much.

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