How To Handle Timeshares in a Divorce

Unfortunately, divorce is a very real possibility for some married couples. Timeshares, like all other shared assets and liabilities, must be addressed in the event of a divorce. Because divorce is a complicated and often emotional process, it is a good idea to consider hiring a divorce lawyer to help you navigate the system. But whether you have a lawyer or not, your options for handling a timeshare in a divorce are the same as any other asset: sell, award, or share it.

  1. Sell: Timeshares can de difficult to sell, but if neither you nor your spouse wants it, selling is worth a try. You can try to sell the timeshare yourself by listing it on websites like Craigslist, eBay, or TUG. Or you could list the timeshare through the developer or through a resale broker, but be cautious of large upfront fees. Also be aware that you will likely lose money if you choose to sell because more often than not, timeshares are a depreciating asset. If you are able to sell your timeshare and also manage to make a profit, split the proceeds evenly between the two of you. timeshares in a divorce
  2. Award: This is the best option if one of you wants the timeshare more than the other. In this case, one spouse will need to “buy out” the other, meaning you will need to give the other another asset or cash that reflects half the value of the timeshare, or simply split any equity between you. You must then determine if the timeshare is an asset or a liability. One way to do this is by having it appraised. If one of you is willing to just walk away from it, however, you may not even need to place value on it. If there is still debt on the timeshare, make sure your separation agreement contains specific terms for how and when that debt will be paid.
  3. Share: If both you and your spouse have enjoyed using your timeshare over the years and neither of you are willing to part with it, you may opt to share it. This can be risky, though, and should generally only be an option for amicable spouses, as it will require you to maintain some level of communication with one another. Be sure to include very specific details of how this will work in your separation agreement. Address any and all questions you may have in this agreement so that you don’t face any unwanted surprises down the road.

The bottom line here is that you cannot simply ignore your timeshare in a divorce; you have to deal with it, and should do so as early on as possible. Timeshares involve many complicated elements that often require thorough investigation, so give it some serious thought before moving forward. And, again, if you and your spouse are having trouble agreeing on what to do with your timeshare, consider consulting a divorce lawyer to help.

 

Timeshare Presentation Experience – Mayan Palace Nuevo Vallarta

We received the following story submission from one of our users about their experience at a timeshare presentation in Mexico:

“Having a timeshare with RCI, we booked a week at the Mayan Palace Marina in Puerto Vallarta. It was so beautiful and we were so happy with the resort (despite the “dated” reviews it had received) that we agreed to a presentation at their resort in Nuevo Vallarta. What an absolute nightmare! The resort itself was stunningly beautiful and we had high hopes about upgrading. However, the sales woman was incredibly rude. At one point she looked at me and said, “Is the timeshare also in your name? If not, you don’t need to talk.” I was shocked! I told her if she wanted to be cocky we would leave right then. We had been there for over 2 hours (they promisedtimeshare presentation experience 60 minutes).

She said she hadn’t began to get cocky! We said we were done so she called for her manager to “exit” us. He asked why and I told him that the saleswoman had pissed me off and that in no way would we EVER consider buying something from them. He excused her and gave us a line about trying to get rid of her…then proceeded to start all over again to get us to buy. I told him we weren’t interested and that we’d been there 2 1/2 hours already. He proceeded to tell us that our time wasn’t a concern and how in the grand scheme of things the time wasn’t important. Really? I am pretty sure it is. I have a limited amount of vacation time! We insisted that we were done and wanted to leave. He said we were being unreasonable and went to go find someone else for us to talk to. We got up and left. The place is huge and it took 1/2 hour to figure out how to get back to the lobby and get a taxi. But what a relief to be out of there. I would NEVER recommend that particular presentation to anyone!!!!!!!”

RCI/Bahia Principe Experience

We received the following submission from one of our users about their experience with RCI:

RCI“Well I have just hung up the phone with another lovely RCI ‘expert’. There have been transactions going through my credit card for a cruise that I apparently agreed to and did not. A representative called and asked if I was interested. I said I could not commit without discussing with my husband. OH WELL, not a problem if I put a small down payment on the trip they would hold for 10 that is ten days and if not wanted would be refunded. 2 that is two days later I said no we do not want – of course the high pressure but I was adamant – no thank you. Here I am 3 months later still arguing with them that I did not agree to this and they continue to say I did and put transactions through my credit card. I have had to dispute the transactions through my credit card and get them to pull the credit transaction back. Now I have told them to not EVER process another transaction from them again. This is a disgusting way of doing business and borders on theft………….DO NOT TRUST ANY OF THE REPRESENTATIVES THEY JUST WANT THAT SALE.”

Have you had a notable experience with RCI or any other exchange company recently–good or bad? Share your story with us!